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Chapter Two

Chapter 2 - Proposed Stormwater Quality Management Plan

2.0    Purpose
                                                                                                                                                  
The purpose of a Stormwater Quality Management Plan (SWQMP) in Phase II of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) stormwater program originates from the 1990 Clean Water Act (CWA) which aims to preserve, protect, and improve the nation's water resources from polluted stormwater run-off. A SWQMP requires the institution of controls on the unregulated sources of stormwater discharges, otherwise referred to as non-point source pollutants that have proven to be the greatest cause to the impairment of our nation's water resources.

2.1    Governing Authority

The Logansport Stormwater Management Board will continue to serve as the managers and overall governing authority of the City of Logansport's Stormwater Quality Management Plan. In addition to the Board, the Logansport Municipal Utility Departments, the Logansport / Cass County Plan Commission, and the City's Street Department will also be included as major stakeholders in the development, implementation, and maintenance of the proposed Stormwater Quality Management Plan that follows.   

2.2    Minimum Control Measures and their Measurable Goals

The following Stormwater Quality Management Plan (SWQMP) includes six minimum control measures (MCMs): (1) public education and outreach; (2) public participation and involvement; (3) illicit discharge detection and elimination; (4) construction site stormwater run-off control (which is also referred to as erosion control); (5) post-construction run-off control; and (6) pollution prevention and good housekeeping.  These minimum control measures aim to preserve, protect, and improve Logansport's water resources with respect to polluted stormwater run-off. 

Providing outreach and educating the public helps to ensure greater support by the public and greater compliance with the SWQMP itself. The public education and outreach program, outlined in Chapter 3, aims to increase the number of persons residing within the corporate limits of Logansport that are educated about stormwater quality by 5%.  The goal is to achieve the 5% increase by the end of the 5-year permit term.

An active and involved community is crucial to the success of a stormwater management program because it allows for:  broader public support by giving citizens partial responsibility of the program; shorter implementation schedules; a broader base of expertise and economic benefits; and a lead into other programs.  The public participation and involvement program, outlined in Chapter 4, aims to increase the number of persons residing within the corporate limits of Logansport that participate in stormwater quality programs by 5%.  The goal is to achieve the 5% increase by the end of the 5-year permit term.

Recognizing the adverse effects illicit discharges can have on receiving waters, Chapter 5 allows the MS4 Operator to detect and eliminate illicit discharges by gaining a thorough awareness of the entire stormwater sewer system. The illicit discharge detection and elimination program aims to reduce the amount of stormwater pollution caused by illicit discharges within the corporate limits of Logansport by 10%.  The goal is to achieve the 10% reduction by the end of the 5-year permit term.   

Construction site stormwater management in areas undergoing new development or redevelopment is necessary to keep polluted stormwater run-off from entering the MS4 conveyances that discharge into the City of Logansport receiving waters untreated. The construction site run-off control program, outlined in Chapter 6, aims to reduce the amount of total suspended solids leaving individual construction sites by 80%. The goal is to achieve the 80% reduction during the construction period of any new development required to gain local approval. 

Similarly, post-construction stormwater management in areas undergoing new development or redevelopment is necessary to keep run-off from entering the MS4 conveyances that discharge into the City of Logansport's receiving waters untreated.  The post-construction stormwater run-off control program, outlined in Chapter 7, aims to reduce the amount of total suspended solids leaving any new site development or redevelopment after construction by 80%.  The goal is to achieve the 80% reduction for all new site developments required to gain local approval.   

The pollution prevention and good housekeeping measure is meant to improve or protect receiving water quality by altering municipal facilities operations. The pollution prevention and good housekeeping program, outlined in Chapter 8, aims to reduce the amount of stormwater pollution currently caused within operational areas of Logansport by 10%.  The goal is to achieve the 10% reduction by the end of the 5-year permit term. 

2.3    Narrative Summary of Structural BMPs Allowed for New Development & Redevelopment

The following structural BMPs are proposed to be allowed for new development and redevelopment.  The goal of these structural BMPs is to prevent 80% of the total suspended solids (TSS) leaving any new development or redevelopment construction site from entering the City's conveyance system.

Stormwater Ponds:  Stormwater ponds are constructed stormwater retention basins with a permanent pool (or micropool) of water.  Runoff from each rain event is captured and treated in the pool.  This includes wet ponds; wet extended detention ponds; micropool extended detention ponds; and multiple pond systems.

Detention Basins (Dry): A dry detention basin is an area used to detain stormwater for a relatively short period of time.  The area should be dry between storms.  The basin allows for particles and pollutants to settle out of stormwater.

Catch Basins: Catch basin inserts are small filtering devices installed in each catch basin to trap suspended solids and other pollutants.  Catch basin inserts are available in a variety of designs.

Stormwater Wetlands: Stormwater wetlands are constructed, artificial wetland systems used for stormwater management.  They consist of a combination of shallow marsh areas, open water, and semi-wet areas above the permanent pool. This includes shallow wetlands; extended detention wetlands; pond/wetland systems; and pocket wetlands.

Bioretention Areas: Bioretention areas are shallow stormwater basins or landscaped areas that utilize engineered soils and vegetation to capture and treat stormwater run-off.

Sand Filters: Sand filters are multi-chamber structures designed to treat stormwater run-off through filtration using a sand bed as its primary filter media. This includes surface sand filters and perimeter sand filters.

Water Quality Swales: Water quality swales are vegetated open channels that are designed and constructed to capture and treat stormwater run-off within dry cells.  This includes dry swales.

Biofilters: Biofilters provide some filtering capabilities, however, they cannot meet the 80% TSS reduction goal and must, therefore, be used only as pretreatment measures or as part of a treatment train. This includes filter strips and grass channels.

2.4    Narrative Summary of Structural BMP Selection Criteria

The following selection criteria for structural BMPs are allowed for new development and redevelopment.  Again, the goal of these structural BMPs is to prevent 80% of the total suspended solids (TSS) leaving any new development or redevelopment construction site from entering the City's conveyance system.

Development of Open Land:  The following BMPs are appropriate when developing individual lots of open land for commercial strips, light industry, and institutions: bioretention; wet ponds; detention basins; artificial wetlands; sand filters; water quality swales; catch basins; and biofilters.  Again, biofilters may only be used in combination with other appropriate BMPs in order to obtain a percentage reduction goal of 80%.

The following BMPs are appropriate when developing open land for commercial or industrial subdivisions: wet ponds; detention basins; and wetlands.

The following BMPs are appropriate when developing open land for residential properties: bioretention; wet ponds; detention basins; artificial wetlands; water quality swales; and biofilters.

Redevelopment of a Commercial Building or Strip with Medium Imperviousness: The following BMPs are appropriate when redeveloping a commercial building or strip with medium imperviousness into another commercial development or strip: bioretention; sand filters; catch basins; wet ponds; detention basins; and wetlands.

Redevelopment of a Commercial Building or Strip that is Small or has High Imperviousness: The following BMPs are appropriate when redeveloping a commercial building or strip that is small or has high imperviousness into another commercial development or strip: bioretention; sand filters; and catch basins.

Redevelopment of Transportation Infrastructure:  The following BMPs are appropriate when increasing or expanding transportation infrastructure: water quality swales; wet ponds; detention basins; artificial wetlands; and catch basins.

Allowed BMPs, selection criteria for appropriate BMPs, and performance standards for individual BMPs are discussed in more detail in the City's Development Standards Manual.

2.5    Schedule for On-going Receiving Water Characterization

The characterization of Logansport's receiving waters was inconclusive given that past testing locations, monitoring parameters, monitoring frequency, and monitoring protocol were inconsistent.  Therefore, the following is the proposed monitoring program to establish a baseline for the quality of the City's receiving streams.

Locations: Locations of monitoring points were developed based on land use information in relation to the receiving stream locations.  Monitoring points were developed in a manner so that the data will cover significant stretches of the receiving streams. The purpose of the layout of the monitoring points is to first collect data over a large area. Then, collected data will be analyzed to further associate particular land uses with stormwater pollution. Monitoring points may be changed in the future to gain a better understanding of more specific areas.

There is at least one monitoring point for each receiving stream. If a receiving stream begins within Logansport's corporate limits, the receiving stream only has one monitoring point. If a receiving stream begins outside of Logansport's corporate limits, a monitoring point was established nearest a point that the receiving stream enters Logansport's corporate limits.  A second monitoring point was established for the same receiving stream at a point where the receiving stream leaves the corporate limits.

Proposed Monitoring Locations

Monitoring Point

Receiving Stream

Location on Receiving Stream

1

Wabash River (Upper)

Just outside the corporate limits at the 18th Street bridge.

2

Wabash River (Lower)

Outside the corporate limits at the U.S. 24 U.S. 35 crossing

3

Eel River (Upper)

Just outside the corporate limits at Davis Road bridge

4

Eel River (Lower)

Just north of the confluence of the Wabash River at the Market Street bridge

5

Horney Creek (Upper)

Just within corporate limits between Meadlawn Ave and U.S. 25 adjacent to the Conrail RR.

6

Horney Creek (Lower)

Within the corporate limits just north of the confluence of the Eel River

7

Goose Creek (Upper)

At the U.S. 24-35 crossing

8

Goose Creek (Lower)

Within the corporate limits and south of the confluence with the Wabash River.

 The proposed monitoring locations are located on the MS4 Conditions Map, Appendix B. 

Parameters: The parameters on the following page will be tested at each location for each testing event.

Proposed Monitoring Parameters

 

Parameter

 

Unit

 

Sample

Oil and grease

mg/l

grab

CBOD5 (Carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand)

mg/l

grab

COD (Chemical oxygen demand)

mg/l

grab

TSS (Total suspended solids)

mg/l

grab

TKN (Total Kjeldahl nitrogen)

mg/l

grab

Total phosphorous

mg/l

grab

pH

s.u.

grab

NH3 (Ammonia)

mg/l

grab

Nitrate plus nitrite nitrogen         

mg/l

grab

E.coli   

Colonies/100mL

grab

DO (Dissolved Oxygen)

mg/l

grab

Total Cadmium

mg/l

grab

Hardness - Calcium Carbonate

mg/l

grab

Total Zinc

mg/l

grab

Arsenic

mg/l

grab

Total Copper

mg/l

grab

Total Lead

mg/l

grab

Total Mercury

mg/l

grab

Total Nickel

mg/l

grab

 Frequency: Monitoring will be conducted starting in May of 2005 and will continue to be done on an annual basis each May for the duration of the City's NPDES permit.  Monitoring will include one dry weather sample and one wet weather sample for each of the four sampling locations.

Protocol: All eight dry weather samples will be taken on the same day.  A dry weather sample should be taken after a minimum of four days without rainfall. The eight wet weather samples will be taken within 24 hours of the end of the rain event.

2.6    Narrative Summary of the Current & Projected Stormwater Budget

Current financing of stormwater projects originates from Logansport's Stormwater Utility funds. Ultimately all financing will be provided by anticipated funds from the stormwater management user fee ($2.95 per month per resident). The following is the projected stormwater budget for the City of Logansport.  Each fee includes professional fees, municipal wages and benefits, as well as reproduction costs.

1.      Public Education and Outreach: $10,000/year

2.      Public Participation and Involvement: $10,000/year

3.      Illicit Discharge Detection and Elimination: $15,000/year

4.      Construction Site Run-off Control (Erosion Control): $12,000/year

5.      Post-Construction Run-off Control: $12,000/year

6.      Pollution Prevention and Good Housekeeping; $20,000/year

7.      On-Going Water Quality Characterization: $10,000/year

8.      Other: $30,000/year

Monies allocated to each of the above line items are subject to change.  Individual programs may require more or less money, depending on their efficiency and/or success throughout the 5-year permit term.

2.7    Timetable for Program Implementation

The table on the following page identifies the milestones fully implementing the requirements set forth in Rule 13.  A copy of 327 IAC 15-13 is included in Appendix C.  Rule 327 IAC 15-5 (Rule 5) is referenced in Rule 13.  A copy of Rule 5 is included in Appendix D.  In addition, there are 5-year implementation schedules for each of the activities, programs, and controls proposed in each of the minimum control measure chapters, Chapters 3-8.

 

Implementation Schedule

 

Rule 13 Requirement

Milestones*

 

Stormwater Quality Management Plan:

 

Components throughout term of permit

 

Part A: Initial Application submitted

 

With NOI letter

 

Part B: Baseline Characterization and Report submitted

May 1, 2004

 

Part C: Program Implementation submitted

November 2, 2004

 

Public Education and Outreach MCM implementation:

 

Throughout term of permit

 

Public education and outreach program development certification submitted

November 2, 2004

 

Public Involvement/Participation MCM implementation:

 

Throughout term of permit

 

Public involvement and participation program development certification submitted

November 2, 2004

 

Illicit Discharge Detection/Elimination MCM implementation:

 

Throughout term of permit

 

Illicit discharge plan and regulatory mechanism certification submitted

November 2, 2004

 

25% of stormwater outfalls systems mapped

Each year after November 2, 2004

 

All known stormwater outfall systems, with pipe diameters 12 inches or greater or open ditches with 2 feet or larger bottom width, mapped

November 2, 2008

 

Construction Site Run-Off Control MCM implementation:

 

Throughout term of permit

 

Construction site program plan and regulatory mechanism certification submitted

November 2, 2004

 

Post-construction Run-Off Control MCM implementation:

 

Throughout term of permit

 

Operational and maintenance plan certification submitted

November 2, 2005

 

Post-construction program plan and regulatory mechanism certification submitted

November 2, 2005

 

Municipal operations pollution prevention and good housekeeping MCM implementation:

 

Throughout term of permit

 

Operations pollution prevention program development certification submitted

November 2, 2004

*Compliance deadlines have been set based on the date in which IDEM received Logansport's NOI Letter.  This occurred on November 2, 2003. 

2.8    Programmatic Indicators 

The table on the following pages identifies the party or parties with which the MS4 Operator will correspond with in order to obtain all of the information necessary to include each programmatic indicator in the annual report to IDEM. 

The MS4 Operator is responsible for contacting the following responsible parties to inform them of their duties to track the corresponding measurable goals at the beginning of each permit year.  It is then the responsibility of each party listed to provide the MS4 Operator with the information that they have tracked each year.

Programmatic Indicator

Chapter Section

Responsible Party

Affected Parties

i) Number or percentage of citizens that have an awareness of stormwater quality issues

3.1 Initial Assessment of Constituents

MS4 Operator

Same

ii) Number and description of meetings, training sessions, and events conducted to involve citizens.

3.2 Public Education Program

MS4 Operator

Same

ii) Number and description of meetings, training sessions, and events conducted to involve citizens.

iii) Number and percentage of citizens that participate in stormwater quality improvements projects

4.2 Public Participation and Involvement

MS4 Operator

Same

iv) Number and location of storm drains marked or cast

4.2.1 Storm Drain Stenciling

MS4 Operator

See Chapter Section 7.4 also

x) Number of, and estimated amount of material collected from HHW collection

xi) Number and location of citizen drop-off centers for automobile fluids

xii) Number or percentage of citizens that participate in HHW collections

4.2.4 Household Hazardous Waste Collection

Director of the Cass County Solid Waste District and the MS4 Operator

Same


 

Programmatic Indicator

Chapter Section

Responsible Party

Affected Parties

xvi) Number of public informational requests received related to construction sites

4.2.5 Incident Reporting

MS4 Operator

Same

v) Estimated or actual linear feet of percentage of MS4 conveyances mapped

vi) Number and location of MS4 area outfalls mapped

5.1 Development of a MS4 Conveyance Map

MS4 Operator

Same

vii) Number and location of MS4 area outfalls screened for illicit discharges

viii) Number and location of illicit discharges detected

ix) Number and location of illicit discharges eliminated

5.3 Development of a Detection and Elimination of Illicit Discharges Plan

MS4 Operator

Same

xiii) Number of construction sites permitted for stormwater quality

xiv) Number of construction sites inspected

xv) Number and type of enforcement actions taken against construction site operators

6.2 Site Plan Review Process (Construction)

MS4 Operator

Same


 

Programmatic Indicator

Chapter Section

Responsible Party

Affected Parties

xvii) Number, type and location of structural BMPs installed

xviii) Number, type and location of structural BMPs inspected

xix) Number, type and location of structural BMPs maintained, or improved, to function properly

xx) Type and location of nonstructural BMPs utilized

xxi) Estimated acreage or square footage of open space preserved and mapped

xxii) Estimated acreage or square of mapped pervious and impervious surfaces

xxiii) Number and location of retail gasoline outlets or municipal, state, federal, or institutional refueling areas with installed BMPs

7.2 Site Plan Review Process (Post-Construction)

MS4 Operator

Same

iv) Number and location of storm drains marked or cast

7.4 Development of an Operational and Maintenance Plan for all Structural BMPs

MS4 Operator

Same

xxvii) Estimated linear feet or percentage and location of MS4 conveyances cleaned or repaired

xxxii) Estimated amount of material by weight collected from catch basin, trash rack, or other structural BMP cleaning.

8.1.2 Stormwater Structure Cleaning, Inspection and Maintenance

Logansport Municipal Utilities

Same


 

Programmatic Indicator

Chapter Section

Responsible Party

Affected Parties

xxxiii) Estimated amount of material by weight collected from street sweeping

8.1.3 Pavement Sweeping

Street Department

Same

xxviii) Estimated linear feet or percentage and location of roadside shoulders and ditches stabilized

8.1.4 Roadside Shoulder and Ditch Stabilization

MS4 Operator

LMU

Street Department

xxvi) Estimated linear feet or percentage and location of unvegetated swales and ditches that have an appropriately-sized vegetated filter strip

8.1.5 Roadside Vegetation Care

MS4 Operator

LMU

Street Department

xxix) Number and location of stormwater outfall areas remediated from scouring conditions

8.1.6  Outfall Inspection, Cleaning and Maintenance

MS4 Operator

Same

xxx) Number and location of de-icing salt and sand storage areas covered or otherwise improved to minimize storm water exposure

xxxi) Estimated amount, in tons, of salt and sand used for snow and ice control

8.2.1  Salt and Sand Storage and Application

Street Department

Same

xxiv) Number and location of entity facilities that have containment for accidental releases

8.2.3  Containment Facilities for Accidental Pollution

MS4 Operator

Same

xxv) Estimated acreage or square footage and location where pesticides and fertilizers are applied by the regulated MS4 entity

8.2.7  Minimization of Pesticides and Fertilizer Usage

MS4 Operator

Same

xxxiv) Number or percentage and location of canine parks sited at least 150 feet away from a surface water body.

8.2.8  Proper Disposal of Animal Wastes

MS4 Operator

Same

Previous Page - Chapter 1 ~ Back To List of Chapters ~ Next Page - Chapter 3

Logansport Municipal Utilities
601 East Broadway #101
Logansport, Indiana 46947

Telephone: (574) 753-6231
Fax: (574) 753-9828
lm.ut@verizon.net

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